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© CNRS - 2019

Mercurio

Reference

6742

Duration

00:01:37

Production year

2019

Versions

Original material

HD
16/9
Color
Sound

Transcription


Title over images:
Mercurio, digitalising 3-D artworks
A sphere for automatically digitalising an artwork in
three dimensions.

Eloi Gattet
former CNRS research engineer and
founder of Mercurio SAS Marseille in 2018

Interview:
We call it Mercurio because it looks like a mercury
molecule which also links it to the planet. The
machine is portable and modular, It can be reduced
or expand according to the object's size

Subtitles over images:
The optical sensors and lights on Mercurio
represent a unique combination enabling the
automatic acquisition of the optical properties of an
object.

Interview:
With Mercurio you can vary the light intensity so as
to accentuate hitherto invisible details. Using the
screen and it's mass of information it's as if you
clutched the object in your hands.

subtitles over images :
Mercurio offers :
- a portable, multidimensional, automatic digitaliser
- adapts to specific needs for museums, artists and
art dealers.

Interview:
We are trying to promote 3D technology and the
access to it.



Director(s)

Fabien CARRÉ

Summary

A spin-off of the Models and Simulations for Architecture and Heritage laboratory (CNRS/Ministère de la Culture), the start-up Mercurio proposes a scanner to quickly and autonomously create realistic 3D models of art objects of all sizes, ranging from a vase to a sculpture. A new way to enhance museum collections.

Personality(ies)

Scientific referent(s)

CNRS Institute(s)

Regional office(s)

CNRS Images,

Our work is guided by the way scientists question the world around them and we translate their research into images to help people to understand the world better and to awaken their curiosity and wonderment.