Sébastien Chastanet

Sébastien CHASTANET

Toulouse

Within an observatory, Sébastien is specialised in scientific photography and scientific missions. Passionate about travelling, Sébastien loves to get lost in a country, a city, in the random lights and landscapes. It is always with great enthusiasm that he prepares his bag for a new photo mission.

20170104_0206
Open media modal

A truck tows the PILOT gondola, attached to an auxiliary balloon, toward the stratospheric balloon, on the tarmac in Alice Springs, Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has…

Photo
20170104_0206
Camion tractant la nacelle PILOT rattachée au ballon auxiliaire, sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0184
Open media modal

Rolling out the PILOT gondola prior to launch, at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has been designed for use in studying the origins of the universe. Its purpose is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way, and study their role in star formation These unprecedented measurements are being…

Photo
20170104_0184
Sortie de la nacelle PILOT avant son lancement, à la base d'Alice Springs.
20170104_0202
Open media modal

The stratospheric balloon for the PILOT mission, on the tarmac at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The balloon, which will expand to a volume of 800.000 cu. m, is inflated on the ground until it becomes buoyant. The PILOT astronomical science balloon, designed for use in studying the origins of the universe, aims to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way…

Photo
20170104_0202
Le ballon stratosphérique de la mission PILOT sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0207
Open media modal

The stratospheric balloon for the PILOT mission, on the tarmac at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The balloon, which will expand to a volume of 800.000 cu. m, is inflated on the ground until it becomes buoyant. The PILOT astronomical science balloon, designed for use in studying the origins of the universe, aims to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way…

Photo
20170104_0207
Le ballon stratosphérique de la mission PILOT sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0185
Open media modal

Rolling out the PILOT gondola prior to launch, at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has been designed for use in studying the origins of the universe. Its purpose is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way, and study their role in star formation These unprecedented measurements are being…

Photo
20170104_0185
Sortie de la nacelle PILOT avant son lancement, à la base d'Alice Springs.
20170104_0203
Open media modal

The stratospheric balloon for the PILOT mission, on the tarmac at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The balloon, which will expand to a volume of 800.000 cu. m, is inflated on the ground until it becomes buoyant. The PILOT astronomical science balloon, designed for use in studying the origins of the universe, aims to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way…

Photo
20170104_0203
Le ballon stratosphérique de la mission PILOT sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0174
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola, seen a few hours before launch, in the hangar at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has been designed for use in studying the origins of the universe. Its purpose is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way, and study their role in star formation These…

Photo
20170104_0174
La nacelle PILOT quelques heures avant son lâcher
20170104_0208
Open media modal

The stratospheric balloon for the PILOT mission, on the tarmac at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The balloon, which will expand to a volume of 800,000 cu. m, is inflated on the ground until it becomes buoyant. The PILOT astronomical science balloon, designed for use in studying the origins of the universe, aims to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way…

Photo
20170104_0208
Le ballon stratosphérique de la mission PILOT sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0196
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola is attached to the auxiliary balloon prior to release, at the Alice Springs launch facility in Australia. The 800.000 cu. m load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola, which weighs 1,058 kg, to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a…

Photo
20170104_0196
La nacelle PILOT est rattachée au ballon auxiliaire avant son lâcher
20170104_0204
Open media modal

A truck tows the PILOT gondola, attached to an auxiliary balloon, toward the stratospheric balloon, on the tarmac in Alice Springs, Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has…

Photo
20170104_0204
Camion tractant la nacelle PILOT rattachée au ballon auxiliaire sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0175
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola, seen a few hours before launch, in the hangar at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has been designed for use in studying the origins of the universe. Its purpose is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way, and study their role in star formation These…

Photo
20170104_0175
La nacelle PILOT quelques heures avant son lâcher
20170104_0209
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola ascends into the sky above the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The flight, which lasted 33 hours and 40 minutes, took place on 16-17 April 2017. The gondola reached a maximum altitude of 40 km. The purpose of the PILOT mission is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust, in order to gain insights into the origins of the universe. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky…

Photo
20170104_0209
Lâcher de la nacelle PILOT
20170104_0197
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola is attached to the auxiliary balloon prior to release, at the Alice Springs launch facility in Australia. The 800.000 cu. m load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola, which weighs 1,058 kg, to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a…

Photo
20170104_0197
La nacelle PILOT est rattachée au ballon auxiliaire avant son lâcher
20170104_0205
Open media modal

A truck tows the PILOT gondola, attached to an auxiliary balloon, toward the stratospheric balloon, on the tarmac in Alice Springs, Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has…

Photo
20170104_0205
Camion tractant la nacelle PILOT rattachée au ballon auxiliaire sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0176
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola, seen a few hours before launch, in the hangar at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The PILOT astronomical science gondola, with a telescope payload, has been designed for use in studying the origins of the universe. Its purpose is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way, and study their role in star formation These…

Photo
20170104_0176
La nacelle PILOT quelques heures avant son lâcher
20170104_0210
Open media modal

The PILOT gondola ascends into the sky above the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. Here we see the various components of the flight assembly, including the main balloon, a parachute, a radar reflector and the gondola. The flight, which lasted 33 hours and 40 minutes, took place on 16-17 April 2017. The gondola reached a maximum altitude of 40 km. The purpose of the PILOT mission is to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust, in order to gain insights into…

Photo
20170104_0210
Lâcher de la nacelle PILOT
20170104_0201
Open media modal

The stratospheric balloon for the PILOT mission, on the tarmac at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The balloon, which will expand to a volume of 800.000 cu. m, is inflated on the ground until it becomes buoyant. The PILOT astronomical science balloon, designed for use in studying the origins of the universe, aims to measure submillimetric polarised emissions from interstellar dust. More specifically, the project aims to map the magnetic fields in the interstellar clouds of the Milky Way…

Photo
20170104_0201
Le ballon stratosphérique de la mission PILOT sur le tarmac d'Alice Springs
20170104_0142
Open media modal

Launching a lightweight dilatable sounding balloon in preparation for the PILOT, CLIMAT and CARMEN/CASOLBA missions at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. These small, sealed dilatable balloons are of the same type as used to gather meteorological data (weather balloons). Despite having a limited payload weight, this type of balloon can collect a great deal of useful data via a wide variety of instruments, such as particle counters or ozone meters, which measure the ozone…

Photo
20170104_0142
Lancement d'un ballon léger dilatable (BLD) sur le site d'Alice Springs
20170104_0147
Open media modal

A tethered balloon is used to identify the wind direction in preparation for the CARMEN/CASOLBA flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. To maximise the flight altitude and duration, balloon launches for the various missions must be planned to coincide with stratospheric wind inversions. The research team therefore consulted data from satellites, radiosonde balloons and tethered balloons, as shown here, in search of the ideal meteorological conditions. CARMEN …

Photo
20170104_0147
Identification de la direction du vent à l'aide d'un ballon captif
20170104_0107
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0107
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0098
Open media modal

Preparing the CARMEN gondola flight assembly at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The flight assembly generally consists of the gondola and its payload of scientific instruments, but also a radar transponder, parachutes to enable a controlled landing during the balloon's post-mission descent, and a small auxiliary balloon from which the gondola is suspended pending lift-off. The CLIMAT flight (Combination of Lasers and Instruments for in situ Measurement of the Atmosphere of Earth)…

Photo
20170104_0098
Préparation de la chaîne de vol de la nacelle CLIMAT, sur le site d'Alice Springs
20170104_0088
Open media modal

Configuring the radar transponder part of the flight string, in preparation for the PILOT, CLIMAT and CARMEN/CASOLBA missions at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. This operation is performed before each flight, as part of the operational service gondola configuration procedure. The role of the radar transponder is to enable communication with other aircraft. Situated in the core of the flight assembly, the operational service gondola receives and transmits data between the airborne and…

Photo
20170104_0088
Paramétrage du transpondeur radar de la chaîne de vol
20170104_0096
Open media modal

The payload launch vehicle retains the CLIMAT flight assembly prior to release at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The flight assembly generally consists of the gondola and its payload of scientific instruments, but also a radar transponder, parachutes to enable a controlled landing during the balloon's post-mission descent, and a small auxiliary balloon from which the gondola is suspended pending lift-off. The CLIMAT flight (Combination of Lasers and Instruments for in situ Measurement…

Photo
20170104_0096
Véhicule traîne tendue permettant de retenir la chaîne de vol avant le lâcher de CLIMAT
20170104_0103
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0103
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0093
Open media modal

A tethered balloon is used to identify the wind direction in preparation for the CLIMAT flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. To maximise the flight altitude and duration, balloon launches for the various missions must be planned to coincide with stratospheric wind inversions. The research team therefore consulted data from satellites, radiosonde balloons and tethered balloons, as shown here, in search of the ideal meteorological conditions. The CLIMAT mission (…

Photo
20170104_0093
Identification de la direction du vent à l'aide d'un ballon captif
20170104_0108
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0108
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0099
Open media modal

Preparing the CARMEN gondola flight assembly at the Alice Springs facility in Australia. The flight assembly generally consists of the gondola and its payload of scientific instruments, but also a radar transponder, parachutes to enable a controlled landing during the balloon's post-mission descent, and a small auxiliary balloon from which the gondola is suspended pending lift-off. The CLIMAT flight (Combination of Lasers and Instruments for in situ Measurement of the Atmosphere of Earth)…

Photo
20170104_0099
Préparation de la chaîne de vol de la nacelle CLIMAT, sur le site d'Alice Springs
20170104_0089
Open media modal

Weather check before launching the CLIMAT gondola at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The CLIMAT flight (Combination of Lasers and Instruments for in situ Measurement of the Atmosphere of Earth) concerns a group of experiments by French and European laboratories aimed at furthering research into atmospheric physics and chemistry. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a ceiling altitude of 33 km. For example, its 2015 flight enabled scientists to…

Photo
20170104_0089
Point météo avant le lancement de la nacelle CLIMAT, à la base d'Alice Springs
20170104_0104
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0104
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0094
Open media modal

A tethered balloon is used to identify the wind direction in preparation for the CLIMAT flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. To maximise the flight altitude and duration, balloon launches for the various missions must be planned to coincide with stratospheric wind inversions. The research team therefore consulted data from satellites, radiosonde balloons and tethered balloons, as shown here, in search of the ideal meteorological conditions. The CLIMAT mission (…

Photo
20170104_0094
Identification de la direction du vent à l'aide d'un ballon captif
20170104_0100
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0100
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0090
Open media modal

A tethered balloon is used to identify the wind direction in preparation for the CLIMAT flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. To maximise the flight altitude and duration, balloon launches for the various missions must be planned to coincide with stratospheric wind inversions. The research team therefore consulted data from satellites, radiosonde balloons and tethered balloons, as shown here, in search of the ideal meteorological conditions. The CLIMAT mission (…

Photo
20170104_0090
Identification de la direction du vent à l'aide d'un ballon captif
20170104_0105
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0105
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0095
Open media modal

A tethered balloon is used to identify the wind direction in preparation for the CLIMAT flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. To maximise the flight altitude and duration, balloon launches for the various missions must be planned to coincide with stratospheric wind inversions. The research team therefore consulted data from satellites, radiosonde balloons and tethered balloons, as shown here, in search of the ideal meteorological conditions. The CLIMAT mission (…

Photo
20170104_0095
Identification de la direction du vent à l'aide d'un ballon captif
20170104_0101
Open media modal

Inflating the auxiliary balloon that will lift the CLIMAT gondola pending its flight at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The load-carrying stratospheric balloon, 50 times larger than the auxiliary balloon, will take over and lift the gondola to an altitude of several tens of kilometres. Auxiliary balloons are used to raise delicate equipment off the ground, with the main balloon taking over afterwards. CLIMAT is a 240 kg gondola, carried under a 150,000 cu. m balloon to a…

Photo
20170104_0101
Gonflage du ballon auxiliaire pour soulever la nacelle CLIMAT dans l'attente de son vol
20170104_0091
Open media modal

Setting up lighting equipment ready for the CLIMAT release at the Alice Springs balloon launch base in Australia. The CLIMAT flight (Combination of Lasers and Instruments for in situ Measurement of the Atmosphere of Earth) concerns a group of experiments by French and European laboratories aimed at furthering research into atmospheric physics and chemistry. For example, its 2015 flight enabled scientists to identify a 10% increase in methane in columns between 0 km and 15 km between 2000 and…

Photo
20170104_0091
Déplacement des moyens d’éclairage en préparation du lâcher de CLIMAT

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